5 Reasons why Children Benefit From Group Music Lessons

Group lessons have a number of benefits for children who are taking music lessons and can especially help children 402_JAS_ArticleReasons_why_Children_learn_better_in_Group_music_Lessonsdevelop social, personal and technical abilities that individual lessons may not.  Group lessons are generally longer in duration, and allow a student to practice more and progress faster as they are learning from their peers.  This is important to note, as numerous studies have been done which has shown that peer learning is more conducive to learning and absorbing when compared to individual lessons.  This will be explained more below.

The following 5 reasons explain why children will benefit more from group music lessons:

1. Heightened Interest:

In group lessons, there is a greater level of interaction and this group interest causes heightened interest in the individual student.  A student and a teacher might have an generational difference and so the conversations would be, somewhat formal.  In group lessons, the communication barrier is dissolved when students communicate with each other, and so learning becomes a group activity.  As such many students maintain and strengthen their levels of interest.

2. Increased Levels of Confidence:

Students make the most of the group environment as they are constantly performing in front of their peers, and that team work means that each individual has a part to play, and they take it on themselves to perform well.  Through the process of contributing, each performer develops a sense of purpose and responsibility within the group and that leads to greater levels of confidence that can be carried across in other areas of their life.

3. Peer learning:

The learning dynamic for a student will be different in groups than it would when they are on their own.  The positive peer learning will assist them in boosting their music skills in a cooperative manner, whilst still giving them the opportunity to find what works for themselves.  Learning from peers allows improvements in creativity but also an increase in quality as members in the group share their own tips and tricks for what has worked for them – this is usually adopted and customised by the individual members and opens up new avenues to improve their techniques, performance and musicianship in general.

4. Competitive Approach:

Students have a tendency to compete and this can be quite healthy, as long as there is positivity and a spirit of cooperation.  This greatly helps students to learn music fast and strive to be better, as whilst they compete with one another to be the best they are lifting their own standards at the same time.

5. Social Competency:

When learning music individually, often budding musicians retreat into themselves and become somewhat reserved.  Again, this can carry through in the rest of their lives.  The collegial spirit that comes with group lessons softly encourages the students to be social, considerate, and cooperative – and this is especially important if the student is looking to pursue music as a career.  It is often these softer and social skills that will benefit a student throughout their career – this is no different to sport, debating or any other team based activity.

For more information about group lessons, call Darko on 0450 144 399 Today.

Comments

  1. says

    In your article, you suggested that through the process of contributing, each performer develops a sense of purpose and responsibility within the group and that leads to greater levels of confidence that can be carried across in other areas of their life. My daughter came home from school today and asked if she could learn to play an instrument. I wonder if there are certain lessons that you can learn from each individual instrument.

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