Why Live Performances are Important for Young Musicians!

performance-350Why Is Performing Live So Important?

In a world of boy-bands, wannabe cover artists and Youtube stars, the factor that will set anyone above the rest is how well they perform in front of an audience. At JumboNote’s Studio B (Beverly Hills), students get to experience the preparation, the rush, and the satisfaction of performing to friends, family and strangers. However, the stage isn’t just for a one-time fun event; it’s an invaluable learning tool for any budding super-star.

 
• Learning By Mistakes
Performing live for the first time can be a very daunting task. Whether you’re a guitarist, pianist, drummer, or vocalist, as soon as you’re on stage playing under hot lights to a room full of people, nerves kick in and really show us where our flaws are. These flaws can be a falsetto note or a hand-stretching chord that we didn’t quite practice enough. This provides musicians with an excellent opportunity to find out their weaknesses and transform them into strengths for the next performance.

 
• Reading A Roomsordrumchick_0
The ability to room-read is a great and very learn-able skill. It allows the performer to analyse things like the audience’s focal points, their response to songs and their attention levels, and then adapt the performance on-the-fly based off that information. This can be applied to performing and interacting with the audience or “breaking the ice”. Room-reading is a skill that (unfortunately) a lot of beginner/intermediate muso’s are lacking, which can lead to a few somewhat awkward performances.

 
• “The Show Must Go On!”
When you perform at an event (especially one with multiple acts), things can get a little disorganised. While it may be a cliché, the phrase “the show must go on” is a very applicable attitude to possess. When unexpected issues arise with equipment, sound systems, staff, time arrangements or a myriad of other small disasters, a professional keeps their cool and puts on a great show nonetheless!

 
F201301151009521969526655• Persona
One of the most difficult parts of being a performer, particularly a solo vocalist, is finding your persona. An artist’s persona is all of their unique characteristics (fashion, voice, presentation, music-genre, charisma, etc.) combined to form an instantly recognisable image.

 

For example, when I say “Michael Jackson”, you see Moonwalking and the iconic white gloves.
When I say “Taylor Swift”, you see the sweet, blonde-haired, red-lipstick girl.
I say “Bono”; you see those stupid sunglasses.
“Kanye”; his very arrogant and egotistical personality.
And so on and so forth…
By frequently performing and trying out various fashion ideas, interaction techniques and performance styles, beginner musicians can get a head-start in discovering a persona that truly defines them as an artist.

 
• Support from Friends, Family & All Music-Loversart-music-family-clapping-inpage_theme_images
Live shows don’t just concern the performers; it involves an audience too! For a young musician, it’s a huge morale boost when family and friends take an interest in your passion and attend performances to show their support, and fellow music-lovers should do the same.
Jumbo Note Music School isn’t just about music lessons; it’s also about creating interest and passion in live music, but there’s only so much we can do without communal involvement. If you are a student at Jumbo Note, already have a student enrolled or you’re thinking about enrolling, please don’t hesitate to attend one of our upcoming concerts!

Event and ticket details can be found in the Upcoming Courses & Events section of our website.
Written by Jaydn Wilson

Piano and Vocal teacher at JumboNote Music School – Beverly Hills & Kogarah

To book in for lessons with Jaydn Wilson, call 0450 144 399.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>